Invasive gobies may change Oneida Lake’s complexion – again

Oneida Lake, a kissing cousin to New York’s Finger Lakes, may soon get an environmental makeover due to another in a series of invasive species bringing havoc to the body’s ecosystem and disturbing its recreational waters.

Invasive round gobies, bottom-feeder fish from Eurasia, appear to diminish zebra and quagga mussel populations and literally cloud the waters of the 80-square-mile lake northeast of Syracuse, New York, according to Stephanie Roh ’19, a Cornell undergraduate. Roh will present her research at the Ecological Society of America’s annual meeting in Portland, Oregon, Aug. 8.  Click on the following quote to access the full story.

“In the past two years, we have observed a decline in total mussel biomass in Oneida Lake – likely because of the rapid growth of the goby population,” said Roh. “If these trends continue, we expect to see lakewide ecological changes such as decreased water clarity very soon.”

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